Zambia National Commercial Bank Plc (ZANACO.zm) Q12012 Interim Report

first_imgZambia National Commercial Bank Plc (ZANACO.zm) listed on the Lusaka Securities Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2012 interim results for the first quarter.For more information about Zambia National Commercial Bank Plc (ZANACO.zm) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Zambia National Commercial Bank Plc (ZANACO.zm) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Zambia National Commercial Bank Plc (ZANACO.zm)  2012 interim results for the first quarter.Company ProfileZambia National Commercial Bank, commonly known as Zanaco, listed on the Lusaka Securities Exchange, serves retail customers, large corporations, agri-business and public sector clients. The bank has evolved into a leading financial institution in Zambia. With the aid of Arise B.V., a leading African Investment Company, Zanaco benefits from technical assistance, international networks and best practices in various areas of banking.last_img read more

Kenya Commercial Bank Limited (KCB.ke) 2020 Annual Report

first_imgKenya Commercial Bank Limited (KCB.ke) listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2020 annual report.For more information about Kenya Commercial Bank Limited reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations visit the Kenya Commercial Bank Limited company page on AfricanFinancials.Indicative Share Trading Liquidity The total indicative share trading liquidity for Kenya Commercial Bank Limited (KCB.ke) in the past 12 months, as of 3rd June 2021, is US$130.67M (KES14.19B). An average of US$10.89M (KES1.18B) per month.Kenya Commercial Bank Limited Annual Report DocumentCompany ProfileKenya Commercial Bank Limited (KCB Bank) is a financial services institution in Kenya offering products and services to the commercial sector. The banking group offers a full-service offering for commercial and corporate clients and runs an Agency banking model. Its parent company, KCB Group, was founded as a branch of the National Bank of India in Mombasa. Grindlays Bank merged with the National Bank of India in 1958 to form the National & Grindlays Bank. The government of Kenya bought a 60% stake in National & Grindlays Bank and took full control of it in 1970; renaming it Kenya Commercial Group. It was renamed KCB Bank Kenya after a corporate restructure. KCB Bank Kenya is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the KCB Group. Its head office is in Nairobi, Kenya. Kenya Commercial Bank Limited is listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchangelast_img read more

Executive Council closes out triennial work

first_img Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Belleville, IL Executive Council April 2012 Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Executive Council closes out triennial work Members debate budget process, consequences of racism Submit a Press Release Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Apr 20, 2012 Rector Knoxville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and the Rev. Joyce Hardy, Executive Council member and a deacon from the Diocese of Arkansas, invite council members and Episcopal Church center staff to Holy Eucharist April 20 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Photo/Mary Frances Schjonberg[Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City, Utah] The Episcopal Church’s Executive Council wrapped up its work of the 2010-2012 triennium here on April 20 by discussing its on-going work against racism and issuing a memo saying that the proposed draft budget released to the church “is not exactly” the one it passed.“We’ve tried to give a non-blame but descriptive, supporting document,” council member Fredrica Thompsett (Diocese of Massachusetts) told her colleagues in presenting the memo for their approval.The memo says there are “potentially many explanations for the multiple errors in the document,” including “too many spreadsheets, too little time” and the “rapid discourse” involving two different budget proposals on the final day of council’s January session.And, the council said, a decision to schedule the Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance‘s meeting on the budget to begin the day after council adjourned in January required council to agree “to a final document before the treasurer’s office had adequate time to draft the document for final review by Executive Council.”In its message to the church, council said that its “disappointment was not simply a reluctance to let go of the budget but instead a very clear statement that the budget sent to PB&F is not the budget council approved.”“Rather than spend time assigning blame, council members moved fairly quickly to a discussion of how to rectify the situation within the confines of the canons,” the message said.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and House of Deputies President Bonnie Anderson said during a post-meeting press conference that the new process that council used to draft its proposed budget was not perfect. Yet, Jefferts Schori said, “it will open the traditional budget process to new ways of thinking.” And Anderson said “we have a process that allows for more input.”Jefferts Schori noted during the press conference that the specific discrepancies council listed in its memo cannot now be corrected in the proposed draft budget. “They’re simply a reflection of council’s intent,” she said.General Convention’s joint rules (II.10 10 (a) require council to give Program, Budget and Finance a proposed budget no less than four months before the start of convention. PB&F begins hearings on the budget on July 3 in Indianapolis, one day before the official start of the 77th meeting of General Convention. Neither council nor PB&F is allowed to change the budget document until that time.Anderson said during her closing remarks to council that she has “great faith in the collective wisdom of the people of this church and I believe that General Convention can do what is necessary to begin our renewal.”Council passed a number of resolutions at its three-day meeting dealing with racism, including one pledging itself to on-going anti-racism training. In its message to the church, the council said it had a “heated and passionate discussion” centered on “how we tease out the differences between anti-racism training and diversity and inclusion training.”Racism, Jefferts Schori said during her closing remarks, “like all sin, has consequences that continue and our difficulties in talking about racism are simply an expression of some of those consequences. It will not be healed in this life, yet we are called to continue to wrestle with it.”Executive Council closed its meeting with Eucharist. The Rev. Gay Jennings, a council member from the Diocese of Ohio whose term is ending, called on those she called “the servants of the church” to discern what they need to let go of so they can “grab on to something new and different that is life-giving and transformative.”“What do we as a church need to embrace in order to be free and changed into His likeness from glory to glory?” she asked“We need to remember that we are about the business of the restoration of creation, together. No more false choices between mission and governance,” Jennings said. “No more false wars between individuals or groups. No more jockeying for turf or power or control. Rather, we have to find ways to look forward together, and envision and incarnate the future God calls us to embrace — and I pray that we will throw ourselves into it with wholehearted abandon.”Also on April 20, council:Sent an A resolution to General Convention that would reaffirm the church’s support of efforts to aid the Diocese of Haiti in its post-earthquake rebuilding work.Heard that real estate firm Cushman & Wakefield is beginning what council member the Rev. Canon Tim Anderson (Diocese of Nebraska) called a “very comprehensive” study of real estate owned by the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society of the Episcopal Church. Bishop Stacy Sauls, Episcopal Church chief operating officer, told council’s Finances for Mission committee a day earlier that the study involves both the Episcopal Church Center at 815 Second Ave. in New York and a city block in Austin, Texas, that was purchased with the intent of constructing a new building for the archives of the Episcopal Church. He and Anderson both said the study would also explore issues such as the cost of relocating the church center and its impact on the staff. The study is being funded by Diocese of Los Angeles Bishop Jon Bruno, they both said.Heard a presentation of a business plan for a Domestic and Foreign Missionary Cooperative, which Sauls said would be designed to be a voluntary coalition of dioceses, congregation and other church-affiliated institutions to share professional services and realize economies of scale. He proposed beginning a pilot project with five dioceses sharing accounting and financial services, with the intent of expanding to include more participants and including purchasing of other goods and services. Sauls suggested that the administrative functions of dioceses could cross their geographic boundaries “without separating the bishop from the people.” There would be a fee for the services, Sauls said, but participants would save in overall cost. The draft budget for the 2013-2015 triennium includes seed money for the cooperative, but the project would become self-sustaining in five years, he said. Council members urged Sauls to use local suppliers and he agreed, saying that he suspected using such suppliers would be a factor in achieving savings.Approved a completely revised employee handbook for Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society employees. Jennings, a member of the Governance and Administration for Mission committee, said the months of work devoted to the project were a model of how council members and staff can work together. She also singled out John Colon, director of human resources management, saying he was “gracious, graceful [and] knowledgeable.”Spent time evaluating council’s work during the triennium and members’ experience of their service on council. The evaluation was conducting via table conversations with comments posted to the members’ extranet site. There was no group discussion.The Executive Council carries out the programs and policies adopted by the General Convention, according to Canon I.4 (1)(a). The council is composed of 38 members, 20 of whom (four bishops, four priests or deacons and 12 lay people) are elected by General Convention and 18 (one clergy and one lay) by provincial synods for six-year terms, plus the presiding bishop and the president of the House of Deputies.Previous ENS coverage of the Salt Lake City meeting is here.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Executive Council, Curate Diocese of Nebraska AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more

La Diócesis de West Tennessee anunció el exitoso proceso de…

first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Posted Mar 22, 2019 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis La Diócesis Episcopal de West Tennessee recibió una notificación del Obispo Presidente y Primado Michael B. Curry y del registrador de la Convención General, el Reverendo Canónigo Michael Barlowe, de que la obispa electa Phoebe A. Roaf ha recibido la mayoría requerida de consentimientos en el proceso de consentimiento canónico detallado en Canon III.11.3.Al dar consentimiento a su ordenación y consagración, los Comités Permanentes y los obispos con jurisdicción dan fe de que “no hay impedimento debido al cual” la obispa electa Roaf no debe ser ordenada como obispa, y que su elección se llevó a cabo de acuerdo con los cánones.La Reverenda Phoebe A. Roaf fue elegida obispa el 17 de noviembre. El Obispo Presidente Curry oficiará en su ordenación y servicio de consagración el 4 de mayo. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit an Event Listing Rector Knoxville, TN La Diócesis de West Tennessee anunció el exitoso proceso de consentimiento canónico La ordenación y consagración de la obispa electa Roaf el 4 de mayo Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Press Release Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC last_img read more

Education is the silver bullet that enhances EVERYTHING

first_img I enjoyed reading this piece…. Your writing is…right on target! Formal education is of utmost importance to well-rounded learning and informal education is equally important.A significant aspect of education is also everyday experiences and practice. May 4, 2017 at 5:07 pm Reply Dr. Shackelford, your writing above is a very nice opinion submittal. Glad to see your writings on the Apopka Voice……… OpinionBy Dr. Ray ShackelfordEducation is a proactive process to safeguard the future of our children; to improve the quality of life for all communities and people; to protect our local, state, and national economic/security interests with a trained/ experienced/tax paying workforce; to promote and protect our freedom and democracy; and, to assist with crime prevention programs and services. In brief, education gives people the opportunity to make informed decisions based on legal and non-violent acts of personal freedom. Education can be a formal or an informal process.Formal education includes attending schools (i.e., public/private/charter/trade/vocational), colleges, and universities to obtain a certificate, diploma, and/or a degree. Informal education includes visiting museums/libraries/national parks; attending conferences; farm services; senior citizens and veterans’ programs; and youth summer programs leading to self-directed learning. In both cases, skill-sets are enhanced in a life-long learning environment.Overall, education deserves more respect and funding to meet our local, state and national security and economic challenges in a global economy. Education does not run away from accountability, education runs to problem-solving and innovations! In brief, education enables the past, present, and future for the betterment of humanity and world peace. Let us continue to support education with compassion, fairness, integrity and pride!Education is our hero.Ray A. Shackelford, Ph.D., M.P.H., is a retired educator who served as Chair/President of the School Advisory Council (SAC) at an elementary/middle/high school; member of the PTA/PTO/PTSA and IB Council; and as a college/university administrator/Associate Professor. He is a LIFE MEMBER of the Florida A&M University National Alumni Association, Florida State University Alumni Association, and Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. Dr. Shackelford is a concerned citizen who advocates for education; youth programs; crime prevention programs and services; fiscal integrity; and, the involvement of ALL communities and people in the economic development process. Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate TAGSDr. Ray ShackelfordEducation Previous articleEthics complaint filed against KilsheimerNext article300 marchers bring their message to Apopka: “Si Se Puede” Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Mama Mia LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Reply center_img Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Fannie Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 May 2, 2017 at 10:32 am The Anatomy of Fear 2 COMMENTS Please enter your name here Please enter your comment! Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitterlast_img read more

December Grant opportunities available for non-profits and more

first_imgU.S. Representative Val Demings shares federal grant opportunities for December for District 10. Grants are generally available to non-profit organizations and state or local government entities. Individuals and private companies may apply for research funds based on specific federal agency funding opportunities.Federal funding is extremely competitive and limited in availability, and it is Demings’ hope that this information will be a helpful resource for the grants process.For more information about getting started and the application process, please visit www.grants.gov, or contact Erin Waldron, Director of Economic and Community Development for Rep. Demings office at 321-388-9808. Rep Demings says that her office is here to assist you with any of your needs.Helpful LinksAre you eligible for a federal grant?What are your next steps?Learn how to write grant applications Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Upcoming Grant OpportunitiesNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Effects of Sea Level Rise – Department of CommerceAward Ceiling: $500,000Application Deadline: January 7, 2021Description: This solicitation is to improve adaptation and planning in response to regional and local effects of sea level rise and coastal inundation through targeted research on key technologies, natural and nature-based infrastructure, physical and biological processes, and model evaluation. The overall goal of the ESLR Program is to facilitate informed adaptation planning and coastal management decisions through a multidisciplinary research program that results in integrated models of dynamic physical and biological processes capable of evaluating vulnerability and resilience under multiple SLR, inundation, and management scenarios. Eligible applicants for Federal financial assistance in this competition are institutions of higher education, other non-profits, state, local, Indian Tribal Governments, U.S. Territories, and for-profit organizations.More Information:https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=328992Farm to School Grants – Department of AgricultureAward Ceiling: $100,000Application Deadline: January 8, 2021Description: The purpose of this grant program is to train and provide support to postdoctoral health care professionals who are planning to pursue careers in biomedical and behavioral health research related to primary care. This NRSA program supports institutional training grants awarded to eligible institutions to develop or enhance postdoctoral research training opportunities for qualified individuals who are planning to pursue careers in primary care research.More Information: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=328430History of Equal Rights Preservation Grants – Department of the InteriorAward Ceiling: $500,000Application Deadline: January 12, 2021Description: The National Park Service’s (NPS) History of Equal Rights Grant Program (HER) will preserve sites related to the struggle of all American’s to achieve equal rights. HER grants are funded by the Historic Preservation Fund (HPF), administered by the NPS, and will fund a broad range of preservation projects for historic sites including architectural services, historic structure reports, preservation plans, and physical preservation to structures. Grants are awarded through a competitive process and do not require non-Federal match.More Information: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=329759African American Civil Rights Preservation and Research Grants – Department of the InteriorAward Ceiling:  $500,000Application Deadline: January 12, 2021Description: The National Park Service’s (NPS) African American Civil Rights Grant Program (AACR) will document, interpret, and preserve the sites and stories of the full history of the African American struggle to gain equal rights as citizens and the transatlantic slave trade. The NPS 2008 report, Civil Rights in America, A Framework for Identifying Significant Sites, will serve as a guide in determining the appropriateness of proposed projects and properties. AACR Preservation Grants are funded by the Historic Preservation Fund (HPF), administered by the NPS, and will fund a broad range of preservation projects for historic sites including architectural services, historic structure reports, preservation plans, and physical preservation to structures. Grants are awarded through a competitive process and do not require non-Federal match. There are separate funding announcements for physical preservation projects and for historical research/documentation projects. Funding announcement P21AS00200 is for physical preservation of historic sites only; P21AS00199 is for historical research/documentation/survey/nomination projects.More Information: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=329757Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections – National Endowment for the HumanitiesAward Ceiling:  $350,000Application Deadline: January 14, 2021Description: The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Division of Preservation and Access is accepting applications for the Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections program.  The purpose of this program is to help cultural institutions meet the complex challenge of preserving large and diverse holdings of humanities materials for future generations by supporting sustainable conservation measures that mitigate deterioration, prolong the useful life of collections, and strengthen institutional resilience (i.e., the ability to anticipate and respond to disasters resulting from natural or human activity.)More Information: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=329800Security and Preparedness Program – National Science FoundationAward Ceiling: None listed, use link for more informationApplication Deadline: January 15, 2021Description: The Security and Preparedness (SAP) Program supports basic scientific research that advances knowledge and understanding of issues broadly related to global and national security. Research proposals are evaluated on the criteria of intellectual merit and broader impacts; the proposed projects are expected to be theoretically motivated, conceptually precise, methodologically rigorous, and empirically oriented. Substantive areas include (but are not limited to) international relations, global and national security, human security, political violence, state stability, conflict processes, regime transition, international and comparative political economy, and peace science. Moreover, the Program supports research experiences for undergraduate students and infrastructural activities, including methodological innovations. The Program does not fund applied research. In addition, we encourage you to examine the websites for the National Science Foundation’s Accountable Institutions and Behavior (AIB) and Law and Science (LS) programs.More Information:https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=320087Child Abuse Training for Judicial and Court Personnel – Department of JusticeAward Ceiling: $3,200,000Application Deadline: January 19, 2021Description: This solicitation provides funding to support training and technical assistance for judicial personnel and attorneys, particularly personnel and practitioners in juvenile and family courts, and administrative reform in juvenile and family courts. The following entities are eligible to apply: Eligible applicants are limited to organizations that have broad membership among juvenile and family court judges and have demonstrated experience in providing training and technical assistance to judges, attorneys, child welfare personnel, and lay child advocates.More Information: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=330169Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities – Department of Homeland SecurityAward Ceiling: $3,200,000Total Program Funding: $500,000,000Description: The Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC) program makes federal funds available to states, U.S territories, Indian tribal governments, and local communities for pre-disaster mitigation activities. The guiding principles of the program are to: Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Please enter your name here Photo by Austin Chan on Unsplash Grants Recently Awarded in District 10COVID Emergency Protective Measures Funding – Federal Emergency Management AgencyRecipient: Florida Department of Emergency ManagementAward: $1,870,242.30Description: During the incident period, the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic created an immediate threat to the public health and safety of the state of Florida. In response to the event and based on the modeling of the spread of the Coronavirus, the state of Florida assisted in the creation and suppling of multiple Alternate Care Sites (ACS) throughout the state. The costs for these ACS include monthly rental, mobilization and demobilization, renting portable x-ray machine to be staged at the mobile hospital, demobilizing care sites not in use, providing security services at care center sites, purchasing materials such as flowmeter oxy brass, flame resistant cube care polyester mesh, metal chain and hook, curtains and tracks, drawers and railings for hospital beds, oxygen for care sites, installed cables at care sites, providing labor, and food for staff. No insurance proceeds are anticipated for this project.Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) Grant – Department of JusticeRecipient: Orange County Sheriff’s OfficeAward: $2,500,000Description: The funding is provided through the DOJ’s Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) grant program, which helps state and local law enforcement agencies reduce crime by supporting community policing strategies and allowing them to hire more uniformed officers. The program will award $2.5 million to the Orange County Sheriff’s Office to hire 20 officers.Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) Grant – Department of JusticeRecipient:  City of OrlandoAward:$1,750,000Description: The funding is provided through the DOJ’s Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) grant program, which helps state and local law enforcement agencies reduce crime by supporting community policing strategies and allowing them to hire more uniformed officers. The program will award $1.75 million to the City of Orlando to hire 10 officers.CARES Act Urbanized Area Formula Grant – Department of TransportationRecipient: Florida Department of TransportationAward: $22,711,000Description: This Federal Transit Administration grant will fund the Central Florida Rail Corporation’s operation of SunRail, including maintenance of SunRail vehicles and operational facilities and dispatching services over the corridor.Hurricane Irma Funding – Federal Emergency Management AgencyRecipient: Orange County GovernmentAward: $3,580,497Description: During the incident period, Hurricane Irma made landfall with hurricane force winds, heavy rain, and storm surge, depositing leaning and hanging branches throughout Orange County. This created an immediate threat to property, and the health and safety of the general public. It caused unsafe traveling and inability to access public roads, fire stations, Emergency Medical Services (EMS) stations, and Emergency Operations Centers. In response to the event, the applicant utilized Contract Services to perform the debris removal and monitoring activities. The Applicant has chosen to participate in the Public Assistance Alternative Procedures (PAAP) for the reimbursement of Straight Time for Force Account Labor cost for debris removal and monitoring. The debris removal operations collected approximately 93 hazardous leaning trees, 59,751 hazardous hangers, and 1 exposed stump. Contract Services reduced and managed the vegetative debris by chipping at two (2) permitted Temporary Debris Site Reduction (TDSR) locations, then hauled the reduced vegetative debris to one (1) permitted Final Disposal Site. The debris removal was captured on another project and deducted from this project’s cost. The Applicant utilized Contract Services to monitor the debris removal activities performed during the period of 10/18/2017 through 12/16/2017. Total project costs funded at a 90% federal cost share.Health Center Cluster Grants – Department of Health and Human ServicesRecipient: Health Care Center for the HomelessAward: $2,084,953Description: This grant awards funds for community-based and patient-directed organizations that deliver comprehensive, culturally competent, high-quality primary health care services. Health centers also often integrate access to pharmacy, mental health, substance use disorder, and oral health services in areas where economic, geographic, or cultural barriers limit access to affordable health care services. Health centers deliver care to the Nation’s most vulnerable individuals and families, including people experiencing homelessness, agricultural workers, residents of public housing, and the Nation’s veterans. Please enter your comment! Support state and local governments, tribes, and territories through capability- and capacity-building to enable them to identify mitigation actions and implement projects that reduce risks posed by natural hazards;Encourage and enable innovation while allowing flexibility, consistency, and effectiveness;Promote partnerships and enable high-impact investments to reduce risk from natural hazards with a focus on critical services and facilities, public infrastructure, public safety, public health, and communities;Provide a significant opportunity to reduce future losses and minimize impacts on the Disaster Relief Fund (DRF); andSupport the adoption and enforcement of building codes, standards, and policies that will protect the health, safety, and general welfare of the public, take into account future conditions , and have long-lasting impacts on community risk-reduction, including for critical services and facilities and for future disaster costs. Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter From the Office of U.S. Representative Val Demings, District 10 The Anatomy of Fear You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. TAGSApplicationDecember 2020Federal GrantsFundsIndividualsNon-ProfitsOpportunitiesPrivate CompaniesResource Links Previous articleAAA warns of aggressive holiday driving and offers advice for dealing with road rageNext articleNASA shares how to watch Jupiter-Saturn Great Conjunction: ‘Best view since Middle Ages!’ Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR More Information:  https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=328472last_img read more

USDA August Crop Market Update

first_imgHome News Feed USDA August Crop Market Update All opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Water Street Advisory. This data and these comments are provided for information purposes only and are not intended to be used for specific trading strategies. Although all information is believed to be reliable, we cannot guarantee its accuracy or completeness. There is significant risk of loss involved in commodity futures and options trading and may not be suitable for all investors. www.waterstreet.orgor 1-866-249-2528 By Eric Pfeiffer – Aug 10, 2018 Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitter SHARE Previous articleGetting Set for August Crop Report and The Glass Barn’s Untold Story of the Soybean on the HAT Friday Morning EditionNext articleHoosier Ag This Week: USDA Crop Report Eric Pfeiffer USDA August Crop Market Update At midday, corn -5 ½, soybeans -25, Chicago wheat -6 ¼, KC wheat -7 ¼, Minneapolis wheat -9 USDA Update SHARE Watch live coverage from the Indiana State Fair with reaction to the August WASDE report from Purdue University experts here beginning at 1:30ET.last_img read more

Commissioners delay courthouse debt decision

first_img Twitter A photo of the south west side of the Ector County Courthouse on Wednesday from the intersection of 3rd Street and Grant Avenue. Landgraf staffer resigns following investigation WhatsApp Facebook Church leaders condemn mayor’s disparaging comments Pinterest Landgraf prepares for state budget debate Ector County Commissioners were split during their regularly scheduled meeting Monday over the issue of publishing a notice of intent to issue $85 million of debt for a new courthouse, ultimately rejecting the idea 3-2.Precinct 1 Commissioner Eddy Shelton and County Judge Ron Eckert supported the motion to publish, with Eckert telling the commissioners and the public to stop listening to the small voices of fear and take a step forward on faith to replace the “blighted building eyesore.” But commissioners Greg Simmons, Dale Childers and Armando Rodriguez asked for more time to look at funding options and to talk to city officials and other entities about the project.Following the motions to vote from Shelton and Eckert, Precinct 3 Commissioner Childers said that, while the courthouse is an urgent matter, he still had unanswered questions with the city before he could approve the notice.Childers said the courthouse committee will meet within the month and added he would like to know the county’s revenue for the year before making a decision. County Auditor David Austin said they would have an estimated assessment of the county’s revenue on Thursday.Childers also said he was concerned that the $85 million debt would not be enough for the courthouse project, stating that the previous bond amount for the new courthouse, which was voted down in 2016, was $95 million.“I know the building costs have not gone down since 2016, so this $85 million concerns me that it’s not enough, but I don’t have enough information to make an intelligent decision, in my mind,” Childers said.Shelton told Childers that it would not be enough for the total project, just enough for the new building, and that the total project would have collaboration from other entities.“So you’re assuming that we are going to get help in here, assuming that it’s another $15 million from somewhere?” Childers asked Shelton.“That’s my assumption,” Shelton replied.“To me, that’s a big assumption,” Childers said.Hilltop Securities Director Erick Macha was at the meeting, and told commissioners that should the county require another $15 million, it would have to be from a separate debt issuance, should the $85 million pass, which would also have another bond issuance cost of around $150,000.Eckert reiterated the urgency of replacing the courthouse, not wanting to wait longer to publish the notice.“I don’t think anyone who’s worked there doesn’t see these conditions on a daily basis,” Eckert said. “If you work up there, you might have had your turn like I did, putting a bucket under leaking sewage.”Eckert talked about the structural problems with the building and said the cost could increase further should they wait longer.“Certificates of obligation are the best means of doing this, because you can move quicker into the construction phase,” Eckert said.Despite Eckert’s pleas, the motion failed. Precinct 4 Commissioner Rodriguez said the Courthouse Committee formed with the city needs more time to figure out the details of the project, the budget, and get more feedback from the public.Simmons supported looking for a cheaper alternative, rather than going straight to issuing an $85 million debt.“If the entire Marriott Hotel can be built for $40 million, we should be able to build a building for cheaper than $85 million,” Simmons said after the meeting.Simmons also said he supported going to a bond election over a debt issuance.“I like the part of the Constitution that says we’re a government for the people, of the people, and by the people, and to circumvent their approval on putting themselves into debt, I think is a negative,” Simmons said. “It tends to put us at odds with our voters who put us here in office in the first place.”Also during the meeting, a motion regarding proposed additions, upgrades and modifications to the jail expansion project was withdrawn by Building Maintenance Director Charles Pierce, to be reissued at a later meeting. An agreement with Oncor to provide power to the jail expansion was approved by commissioners.IN OTHER BUSINESS, COMMISSIONERS:Approved a donation of $1,000 from the First United Pentecostal Church for the purchase of vests for the Ector County Sheriff’s Office.Approved a donation of $3,000 from Citron’s Used Auto Parts Inc. for ECSO.Approved a proposed purchase of a 2018 Ford Super Cab Pickup using the $25,000 donation from Oxy for ECSO.Approved a request to convey a portion of the American Legion Baseball Field and adjoining county property to Odessa College.Approved a request to approve out-of-state travel for an Assistant County Attorney to attend a Domestic Violence Seminar hosted by the National District Attorney’s Association from Oct. 29 to Nov. 7 in Long Beach, Calif.Appointed Timothy Benton, M.D., as Acting Local Health Authority in absence of the appointed Local Health Authority for the Ector County Health Department.Approved a proposed transfer of County Inventory Asset No. 44435, equipment services unit No. 895, 2009 Ford cargo van, Vehicle Identification No. 1FTNE14L89DA49664, from Senior Citizens Center to Elections Administrator Office.Approved a request to install “FleetZoom Cellular Monitoring System” at current county generators located at County Administrative Building (Annex), County Courthouse, Law Enforcement Center, County Airport and Juvenile Probation Center to monitor plant operational activities, and to approve a proposed line item transfer to equipment services fund, equipment maintenance and repair, from equipment services fund, motor vehicle repairs & maintenance for $11,534.Approved the proposed disposition and donation of a lateral retrieval file system in the district clerk’s office.Approved the proposed 2018-2019 budget calendar for Ector County.Approved the Roofing Project 2018 — Phase I competitive sealed proposal specifications.Approved the following bid specification: Ramp Grant 2017-2018 Signage Upgrade & Surge Suppression Projects.Authorized the County Judge and other county employees to complete and sign the Accreditation in State Library System Application, together with the required certification, as part of the annual report to the Texas State Library.Approved a proposed service agreement with vendor TCN, previously named GlobalConnect.Approved the proposed master service agreement for Permian Glass Company, Inc., doing business as Permian Glass.Approved the proposed extension of the Food Services Agreement with Summit Food Service for Ector County Juvenile Probation.Approved a request to hire a receptionist at a Step 3.Approved a request to hire a paralegal clerk at a Step 4.Approved a proposed revision to the Health Benefits Plan document for Fiscal Year 2018 to include coverage for 3D mammograms.Approved a request to add and authorize PFS Investments to provide a 457 retirement benefits plan for Ector County.Approved proposed Ector County Equipment Donation Policy and Procedures.Approved the proposed Estrada MHRC 5.0600 acre tract located in Pleasant Farms, Block 8, E 348.88 of W 554.88 of S 632.5 of Lot 2.Approved the proposed Evans-Williams MHRC at 12440 W. University Blvd.Approved the proposed Leyva MHRC at W. Miles Street, 0.3444 acre tract located in Miles Subdivision, Block 7, Lots 5-6.Approved the proposed Russell MHRC 2.03 acre tract located at 2112 N. Flamingo Avenue.Approved the proposed J&P Subdivision, a subdivision of 1.47 acres located in Section 5, Block 41, T-1-S, T&P Ry. Co. Survey.Approved the designation of court costs collected for the County Child Abuse Prevention Fund per Code of Criminal Procedure, Article 102.0186.Approved a proposed budget amendment to Airport Capital Improvement Fund, Insurance Settlements to Professional Services in the amount of $139,084.Approved a proposed budget amendment to County Capital Improvement Fund, Insurance Settlements and to Professional Services in the amount of $69,389.Approved a proposed budget amendment to Coliseum Capital Improvement Fund, Insurance Settlements and to Professional Services in the amount of $137,422.Approved a proposed budget amendment to General Fund, I.T., Phone System and Maintenance from Unreserved Fund Balance in the amount of $116,125.Approved a proposed budget amendment to General Fund, Library, New Books for $432 to Library, Postage for $37 to Library, Library Supplies for $3,053 and to General Fund, Donated Revenues for $3,522.Received the Accounts Payable Fund Requirements Report for April 23, 2018, to review County financial statements and reports. WhatsAppcenter_img Pinterest Home Local News Government Commissioners delay courthouse debt decision Twitter Facebook By admin – April 23, 2018 Previous articleDAILY OIL PRICE: April 23Next article‘Concerns’ expressed in Grace McDonald trial admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Local NewsGovernment Commissioners delay courthouse debt decision Foolproof Roasted Pork TenderloinSummer Spaghetti SaladTexas Fried ChickenPowered By 10 Sec Mama’s Deviled Eggs NextStay last_img read more

Clinical Assistant Professor

first_imgPosition SummaryThe Department of Rehabilitation Sciences in the School of PublicHealth and Health Professions ( SPHHP ) is recruiting astate-funded, 10-month Clinical Assistant Professor in the PhysicalTherapy Program.The successful candidate will contribute to the teaching,scholarship and service mission of the program. Duties may includeteaching lecture and laboratory courses; mentoring students inclinical research projects, advising students; and contributing toongoing curriculum quality improvement.Knowledge of higher education, neuromuscular curriculum, andcontemporary clinical practice are essential along with researchexperience and excellent communication skills. Must be licensed oreligible for licensure in NYS .Department, School, and UniversityThe Department of Rehabilitation Sciences at UB has a longstandinghistory of excellence in clinical education in programs leading tothe Doctor of Physical Therapy, the BS/MS in Occupational Therapy,and the PhD in Rehabilitation Science. The PT and OT entry-levelprograms have enjoyed continuous accreditation for more than 60years. For more information on the SPHHP Department ofRehabilitation Sciences, please visit:http://sphhp.buffalo.edu/rehabilitation-science.html.UB SPHHP is one of the only schools in the country to include bothpublic health and health professions, providing uniqueopportunities for collaboration amongst students and faculty. Formore information on UB SPHHP, please visit:http://sphhp.buffalo.edu/.The University at Buffalo is the State University of New York’slargest and most comprehensive research-intensive university and isits primary center for professional education and training. We areMiddle States Commission on Higher Education accredited and amember of the Association of American Universities. UB provides arich environment for collaborative and transdisciplinary researchwith faculty within the SPHHP and at other schools located in theAcademic Health Center (Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, DentalMedicine, Pharmacy and Nursing).EnvironmentBuffalo is the second-largest city in New York State and is locatedon the shores of Lake Erie, upriver of the majestic Niagara Falls.Buffalo – the City of Good Neighbors – is undergoing a renaissancewith a rapidly growing economy, vital academic health sciencescenter, and affordable cost of living. The Western New Yorkeducational system is excellent. Buffalo-Niagara is a region of 1.2million people, world-class art galleries and museums, acomprehensive city-wide system of parks and green space, a vibranttheater and music community, and major and minor league sportsteams.Annual salary commensurate with qualification and rank ofappointment.University at Buffalo is an affirmative action-equal opportunityemployer and, in keeping with our commitment, welcomes all to applyincluding veterans and individuals with disabilities.Minimum Qualifications• MPT or DPT degree• Licensed or eligible for licensure in NYS• Advanced credentials in neurological PT• Ability to teach neuromuscular curriculum within the DPTprogram• Teaching experience and involvement in professionalassociationsPreferred QualificationsAdvanced doctoral training (PhD, EdD, ScD)For more information, click the “How to Apply” button.last_img read more

Governor Pence Makes Appointments To Various Boards And Commissions

first_imgIndianapolis – Vice President-elect Governor Mike Pence recently made appointments to various Boards and Commissions.Indiana State Commission on AgingRobert J. Bischoff [Dearborn County], reappointed to serve a four-year term through November 15, 2020Ball State University Board of TrusteesMichael D. McDaniel [Marion County], appointed to complete an unexpired four-year term through December 31, 2017Early Learning Advisory CommitteeLacey D. Kottkamp [Hamilton County], appointed to complete an unexpired two-year term through October 31, 2017Education Employment Relations BoardKimberly D. Jeselski [Marion County], appointed to complete an unexpired four-year term through July 31, 2019Law Enforcement Training BoardDavid W. Wantz [Marion County], appointed to serve a four-year term through November 15, 2020State Museum & Historic Sites Corporation Board of TrusteesKip E. Tom [Kosciusko County], appointed to serve a three-year term through November 15, 2019 Native American Indian Affairs CommissionPaul C. Strack [Allen County], appointed to complete an unexpired four-year term through July 31, 2018 Occupational Safety Standards CommissionLuciano G. Mezzetta [Marion County], reappointed to serve a three-year term through November 15, 2019 President Benjamin Harrison Conservation Trust Project CommitteeKristopher M. Krouse [Porter County], appointed to serve a two-year term through November 15, 2018 State Workforce Innovation CouncilVincent T. Green [Allen County], appointed to serve a two-year term through November 15, 2018Stephanie M. Wells [Marion County], appointed to serve a two-year term through November 15, 2018 Vincennes University Board of TrusteesReginald K. Henderson [Hamilton County], appointed to serve a three-year term through November 15, 2019 Indiana War Memorial CommissionLawrence R. Long [Whitley County], appointed to serve a three-year term through November 15, 2019 White River State Park Development CommissionLaurie K. Vane [Marion County], appointed to serve a four-year term through November 15, 2020Thomas E. Wheeler, II [Boone County], reappointed to serve a four-year term through December 31, 2020Joe Bill Wiley [Marion County], reappointed to serve a four-year term through December 31, 2020 FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more